A Tribe Called Quest – Midnight Marauders (1993) | Rap & hip hop


A Tribe Called Quest – Midnight Marauders (1993) | Rap & hip hop

Name: A Tribe Called Quest – Midnight Marauders
Genre: Rap | Hip-Hop
Year: 1993
Label: Battery Studios, Platinum Island Studios and Scorcerer Sound in New York City
Featuring: Trugoy The Dove, Raphael Wiggins & Large Professor
Producers: A Tribe Called Quest, Skeff Anselm & Large Professor
Format: mp3 | 320 kbps
Duration: 00:51:12
Size: 116 Mb


Tracklist:

1. Midnight Marauders Tour Guide
2. Steve Biko (Stir It Up)
3. Award Tour Featuring – Trugoy The Dove
4. 8 Million Stories
5. Sucka Nigga
6. Midnight Featuring – Raphael Wiggins
7. We Can Get Down
8. Electric Relaxation
9. Clap Your Hands
10. Oh My God
11. Keep It Rollin’ Featuring – Large Professor
12. The Chase, Part II
13. Lyrics To Go
14. God Lives Through

Review about Albumm "A Tribe Called Quest – Midnight Marauders (1993)"

Though the abstract rappers finally betrayed a few commercial ambitions for Midnight Marauders, the happy result was a smart, hooky record that may not have furthered the jazz-rap fusions of The Low End Theory, but did merge Tribe-style intelligence and reflection with some of the most inviting grooves heard on any early-'90s rap record. The productions, more funky than jazzy, were tighter overall -- but the big improvement, four years after their debut, came with Q-Tip's and Phife Dawg's raps. Focused yet funky, polished but raw, the duo was practically telepathic on "Steve Biko (Stir It Up)" and "The Chase, Pt. 2," though the mammoth track here was the pop hit "Award Tour." A worldwide call-out record with a killer riff and a great pair of individual raps from the pair, it assured that Midnight Marauders would become A Tribe Called Quest's biggest seller. The album didn't feature as many topical tracks as Tribe was known for, though the group did include an excellent, sympathetic commentary on the question of that word ("Sucka Nigga," with a key phrase: "being as we use it as a term of endearment"). Most of the time, A Tribe Called Quest was indulging in impeccably produced, next-generation games of the dozens ("We Can Get Down," "Oh My God," "Lyrics to Go"), but also took the time to illustrate sensitivity and spirituality ("God Lives Through"). A Tribe Called Quest's Midnight Marauders was commercially successful, artistically adept, and lyrically inventive; the album cemented their status as alternative rap's prime sound merchants, authors of the most original style since the Bomb Squad first exploded on wax.

More review:

Can you envision/a brother who ain’t dissin’?” asked A Tribe Called Quest’s Q-Tip on the rap group’s 1990 debut album, People’s Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm, a breakthrough in what became known as Afrocentric hip-hop. It was a refreshing idea then, and Quest pulled it off with panache; their raps were gently wry, while their jazzy jams proved that dope beats don’t need sledgehammer impact to kick ass. In today’s hip-hop climate, where hardcore acts are practically defining the whole genre — at least commercially — it’s an even better idea. Which is why it’s a shame to see Quest partially abandon it on their new album, Midnight Marauders.

Not that the Tribe are suddenly on the gangsta tip — they still make nods to positivity, mostly on the between-songs segments featuring the record’s host, a computerized female voice. But the Tribe are now going for a harder-edged verbal attack, or at least they must think so — the lively wit of past songs like “Skypager” and “I Left My Wallet in El Segundo” is replaced with tired boasts like “I like my beats harder than two-day-old shit.” They try to rationalize the niggas dropped all over this album with the tortured “Sucka Niggas” and concoct a convincing litany of urban and personal woes on “Eight Million Stories.” But instead of coming off impassioned, the Tribe only sound cranky. The music still has its beguiling moments, but nothing approaches the revelatory jazz stylings and laid-back cool of past work. Sadly, the schizzy Midnight Marauders suggests that at this point the band might more accurately be called A Tribe Called Flounder.

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